Moving a DHCP server from one server to another

Here are som nice info on moving DHCP from a Server to another

Sources:

How to move a DHCP database from one server to another in Windows NT 4.0 and in Windows 2000

How to move a DHCP database from a computer that is running Windows NT Server 4.0, Windows 2000, or Windows Server 2003 to a computer that is running Windows Server 2003

Dhcpexim.exe – Tool for exporting database from NT4 or 2000 DHCP

How do I create a driver diskette for an IBM server

Creating diskettes on Windows

Complete the following steps to create a diskette:

1. Insert the IBM ServeRAID Support CD into the CD-ROM drive.

2. Insert a blank diskette into the diskette drive.

3. Open a DOS window.

4. At the command prompt, type the following and press Enter:

e:diskettetoolsdsk4w32 e:diskettediskettetypedisketteimage a:

where

e is the drive letter for the CD-ROM drive.

diskettetype is scsi or sata, depending on the driver type.

disketteimage is the name of the diskette image.

a is the drive letter for the diskette drive.

5. Remove the CD from the CD-ROM drive.

6. Remove the diskette from the diskette drive and label the diskette appropriately.

Delete printer drivers

If the Print Spooler service is operational:

  1. Open the Printers (Printers and Faxes on Windows XP) folder

  2. delete all of the printers

  3. click File, Server Properties

  4. select the Drivers tab

  5. for each entry:

    1. select the entry

    2. click Remove

Usually, this will do a pretty good job of cleaning out drivers with Windows 2000 and later (not so with Windows NT 4). 

 

If the Print Spooler service is not operational, or you want to make certain there are no printer driver remnants, either follow the instructions below or use cleanspl.exe from the Windows 2000, XP or 2003 Resource Kit (http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=9d467a69-57ff-4ae7-96ee-b18c4790cffd&DisplayLang=en).  cleanspl.exe from the Windows 2003 Resource Kit tools will work on Windows XP. 

Some information about cleanspl.exe:

  • cleanspl.exe does a very thorough job of cleaning up the print spooler stuff, but it does not remove the spooler service dependency on the Lexmark service (see special information about Lexmark printer drivers). 

  • You can use it to clean up the spooler stuff on another computer (i.e. remotely). 

  • When you run it, it asks you if you want to remove some things that are actually delivered (and installed by default) with Windows.  In most cases, you should answer No to the corresponding prompts (you don’t want to remove the Standard TCP/IP Port or the BJ Language Monitor).

Here’s how to clean up the print spooler stuff if cleanspl.exe is not available or you prefer to do things manually.

 

Warning! be very careful using regedit – if you delete the wrong things, you may render your computer inoperative!

  1. open regedit (e.g. click Start, key regedit and press Enter)

  2. navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetControlPrintEnvironmentsWindows NT x86Drivers

under this key, there will be the keys Version-2 and Version-3 (one or the other of these may be absent – not a problem)

    the sub-keys under these contain the printer driver configuration information

delete all the sub-keys inside Version-2 and Version-3, but not these keys themselves

The Microsoft Knowledgebase article at http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;312052 lists some other registry entries to delete, but this is not usually necessary.

  1. open a Command Prompt window

  2. key the commands
           net stop spooler
           net start spooler

  3. open Windows Explorer

  4. navigate to %systemroot%system32spoolprinters and delete any files there.  By default, this is where the print spooler stores print files.

  5. navigate to %systemroot%system32spooldriversw32x86 (%systemroot% is usually Windows, but it might be winnt or something else; this is set when the OS is installed).

  6. inside w32x86, there will be folders with the names 2 and 3 (one or more of these may be absent – not a problem)
           delete all of the files and sub-folders in each of the 2 and 3 folders, but not the folders themselves
         inside w32x86, there may be other folders with names starting with “hewlett_packard”, “hphp” or something else; delete these folders also

  7. restart the print spooler (see steps 8 and 9 above)

    Source

Kreolskans Gryta

Kreolskans Gryta 4 port
 
500 g fläskfile (el. skinka el benfri kotlett)
smör
salt
svartpepppar
2 chorizo eller kabanosser
1 gul lök
1 röd paprika
1 msk vetemjöl
2½ dl mat.lagn.grädde
2 dl vatten
1½ msk kalvfond
1 tsk oregano
1 dl cornichons el. annan inlagd gurka
1 dl syltlök
1dl sv. oliver
 
Putsa fläskfilen och skär i skivor.Stek.Salta och peppra.Skiva korven. Skär löken i klyftor. Strimla paprikan. Fräs löken utan att den tar färg.Låt korven fräsa med mot slutet. Strö över vetemjöl och rör om. Häll på grädde, vatten,fond och oregano.koka upp och rör om.Dela chornicherna på längden. Blanda ner kött, paprika, gurka, syltlök och oliver i grytan. Koka på svag värme ca 10 minuter.av med salt och peppar.
 
PS Om du använder annat kött än fläskfile så vänta med att blanda ner syltlök, gurka, oliver och paprika till de sista 10 minuterna . Det tar ju längre tid att få mört. DS

How do I force AD replication

Q. I would like to force AD replication

A: The easiest way to do this is:

repadmin /syncall<destinationDCname><namingcontext> /force

To force ds1 to pull changes from all its replication partners, you’d type

repadmin /syncallds1.acme.comdc=acme,dc=com /force
To force dc1 to pull changes from dc2 type:

repadmin /replicate ds1.acme.com ds2.acme.com dc=acme,dc=com

Source

Environment Variables in Windows

Variable Type Description

%ALLUSERSPROFILE%

Local

Returns the location of the All Users Profile.

%APPDATA%

Local

Returns the location where applications store data by default.

%CD%

Local

Returns the current directory string.

%CMDCMDLINE%

Local

Returns the exact command line used to start the current Cmd.exe.

%CMDEXTVERSION%

System

Returns the version number of the current Command Processor Extensions.

%COMPUTERNAME% 

System

Returns the name of the computer.

%COMSPEC% 

System

Returns the exact path to the command shell executable.

%DATE% 

System

Returns the current date. Uses the same format as the date /t command. Generated by Cmd.exe. For more information about the date command, see Date

%ERRORLEVEL% 

System

Returns the error code of the most recently used command. A non zero value usually indicates an error.

%HOMEDRIVE% 

System

Returns which local workstation drive letter is connected to the user’s home directory. Set based on the value of the home directory. The user’s home directory is specified in Local Users and Groups.

%HOMEPATH% 

System

Returns the full path of the user’s home directory. Set based on the value of the home directory. The user’s home directory is specified in Local Users and Groups.

%HOMESHARE% 

System

Returns the network path to the user’s shared home directory. Set based on the value of the home directory. The user’s home directory is specified in Local Users and Groups.

%LOGONSEVER% 

Local

Returns the name of the domain controller that validated the current logon session.

%NUMBER_OF_PROCESSORS% 

System

Specifies the number of processors installed on the computer.

%OS% 

System

Returns the operating system name. Windows 2000 displays the operating system as Windows_NT.

%PATH%

System

Specifies the search path for executable files.

%PATHEXT%

System

Returns a list of the file extensions that the operating system considers to be executable.

%PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE% 

System

Returns the chip architecture of the processor. Values: x86, IA64.

%PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIER%

System

Returns a description of the processor.

%PROCESSOR_LEVEL% 

System

Returns the model number of the processor installed on the computer.

%PROCESSOR_REVISION%

System

Returns the revision number of the processor.

%PROMPT%

Local

Returns the command prompt settings for the current interpreter. Generated by Cmd.exe.

%RANDOM%

System

Returns a random decimal number between 0 and 32767. Generated by Cmd.exe.

%SYSTEMDRIVE%

System

Returns the drive containing the Windows XP root directory (that is, the system root).

%SYSTEMROOT% 

System

Returns the location of the Windows XP root directory.

%TEMP% and %TMP%

System and User

Returns the default temporary directories that are used by applications available to users who are currently logged on. Some applications require TEMP and others require TMP.

%TIME%

System

Returns the current time. Uses the same format as the time /t command. Generated by Cmd.exe. For more information about the time command, see Time

%USERDOMAIN%

Local

Returns the name of the domain that contains the user’s account.

%USERNAME%

Local

Returns the name of the user who is currently logged on.

%USERPROFILE%

Local

Returns the location of the profile for the current user.

%WINDIR%

System

Returns the location of the operating system directory.

 

Source